Tuesday, 12 May 2015

First Agile impression

Last year, we had a mass recruitment for Java developers with various level of experience. Unfortunately, from this part of the world (Asia) Agile has not been very widely adopted. Therefore, we ended up spend extra effort getting new members to be familiar with Agile and XP.

Over the team forming process, which lasted about 6 months, most of the new team members provided positive feedback about working in an Agile environment. In this article, I would like to share with audiences one of the feedback that we have. Enjoy!

It has been a quickfire six months working in an agile environment. This is my first foray into agile software development in nearly a  decade of working in software. Hearing and reading about it could not have prepared me for the actual experience of working in this peculiar environment. However, the overwhelming sentiment for me is - what a breath of fresh air!

The morning standups were unsettling, to put it mildly. Suddenly, you stopped having excuses for not having done anything the day before :). They take some getting used to, but slowly I’m learning that it is more a sharing session than a status update. Easier said than done, but I’m getting there.  Not sure what you're going to do today? Tell everyone - there’s always something to do.

I like the inherent openness that Agile brings to the table. Seemingly mundane things like outstanding tasks become more explicit and we are all the better for it. Finish a task at hand? No one's stopping you from going to the board and picking a new one. Stuck with a sticky issue? Bring it up in the standup and more often than not, offers of help can be expected. Oftentimes though, a quick holler is all that will be required.

Whole days dedicated to planning and retrospectives demand concentration and focus and more often than not, creativity. I have found that they mean less disruption during the iteration for the most important work of all - writing good code. Worthwhile, no?

We practice pair programming. For someone new to this, the intensity is unexpected as you try to  align yourself to your pair's thought process in a continuous back-and-forth cycle. Overall, I have found it to be quite draining, but I believe the upside cannot be underestimated. Each pairing session, even with the same colleague, seems to involve a whole new dynamic and the constant adjustment needed can be likened to a skill. Working in such close proximity can be a double-edged sword, though. Some friction is inevitable and I have often experienced a whole range of emotions whilst working through a pairing session. I try to manage these emotions and reflect upon them afterwards to understand why I’d felt the way I’d felt and how I could have done better. It is undeniably rewarding though - I have learnt a great deal about myself and my pairs during those sessions.

Test-driven development is standard practice here. Mastering, or rather, adhering to the red-green-refactor pattern seemed counter-intuitive at first, but it starts to make sense after a while. In my limited experience, writing tests becomes more fluid with practice. Since there is almost never an excuse for not providing test coverage for any code that will see the light of day (much less production code!), buckling down and writing that test will be a good habit to develop and one which I am convinced will prove to be an invaluable skill and an integral part in my journey to become a better developer.

Building software has never been quite so engaging and dare I say it..fun. Having a close knit team definitely helps. Hopefully, we can keep the good momentum and spirit going as we welcome new members into our fold and the workload ramps up. It will not be easy, but nobody said it would be. Whatever the future holds, I await with bated breath. Onwards.


Zhi Liang